Metro 2033 by Dmitry Glukhovsky

Metro 2033Metro 2033 by Dmitry Glukhovsky
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Of the ones I’ve read (which admittedly aren’t that many), there isn’t a single book by a Russian author that isn’t packed chock-full of descriptions, long confusing names and equally confusing locations (this has more to do with me being unused to their naming fashion than anything else, though). Metro 2033 is not much different: I found many of the station names a tad confusing until about halfway through the book, and I kept mixing them up. The descriptions were extensive, but pleasant despite the very lousy translation. If you like the subject and you read it properly, it will really transport you to their world of darkness. I did take a bit to start really getting into it though.
Alongside the detailed (if sometimes confusing because of the bad translation) descriptions of physical places came the heavy description of politics, mostly on a per-station basis. It was obvious each little station had their own world, ways of behaving and politics to follow. This too was a bit confusing to me at first, and I couldn’t help but feel slightly identified when Artyom felt totally in the dark about matters mentioned.

The story is pretty basic, but quite enjoyable- not because of the story or the characters itself, but because of the way the world is painted for us. The characters could have had more depth, though (or rather, been developed more as they traveled the metro lines), and the religious cults Artyom encountered did quite a bit to make me feel quite uncomfortable and nervous. Man, would I have run the opposite way!

And what happened to Khan? I sure hope we get to see more of him in book two- he was a bit of a wacky dude, but I liked him.

(view spoiler)

The Kremlin thing didn’t seem very well explained to me anyhow.
Was the underground goo-thing that powerful that, whomever stared the way of the surface-Kremlin was drawn to it by it? Or was the surface-Kremlin a different thing from the underground-Kremlin? And what about the shining rubies or whatever?
Was the goo-thing really a biological weapon or just another mutation?

And the part with Oleg dying, after all they had gone through to get the boy- that felt just like a low blow. Couldn’t they have just saved the kid at the last minute? I admit I was hoping he’d die or something because I really hate disobedient kids that get everyone else in troubles, buuuut it felt bad he did die because it was a dumb death and I actually liked his father. I saw no sense in him ‘reacting’ just when the kids jumped. It felt lame. (hide spoiler)]

At any rate, I loved the book, and I definitely want to read more of the story.

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Songmaster by Orscon Scott Card

SongmasterSongmaster by Orson Scott Card
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I was debating between 3 and 4 for a while, because I liked it, but it was a rather sad book, not to mention I liked the first half better than the second. The second felt hurried, and while I was hoping the book would show more of what happened after the point where the short story ended, I was rather disappointed by the happenings themselves. So, 3 it is.
Also, the cover creeps me out. I keep thinking it looks like his life’s being sucked out, rather than him just singing. It’s something about the way the face is painted. I guess it fits the book though.

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One Giant Leap by Kay Simone

One Giant LeapOne Giant Leap by Kay Simone
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A very nice, slow-burn romance about an astronaut and his CAPCOM. I picked up the book because the premise sounded interesting. Space exploration is something I find very interesting (and I love sci-fi things), and the idea of a slow-burn, age-difference, long-distance relationship was quite attractive.
It didn’t disappoint: I loved the main characters and the way they seemed to fit with each other, as well as their personalities. I was a bit surprised (and sad) that the mission they were on was actually so short, I wouldn’t have minded if it’d been a bit longer and they’d had even more time to build the kind of relationship they did. I also, quite surprisingly, found myself quite fond of the secondary characters and the way they related with each other and the main characters. Though Amal felt a bit like she was trying too hard, like she just had to be “edgy” in every possible way.
Not really sure this is a spoiler, but: (view spoiler)
Though the book was “low-heat”, I felt it quite suited the rest of the writing. I did wish the sex scene was a bit more drawn out, but I didn’t hate the gloss over as it wasn’t really that necessary.

But there were also several things I didn’t like, which is why I’m not rating it 5-stars: The news reports were terribly boring and after a few I just skipped/skimmed through them. The way it sometimes went from past to present in sorta unannounced flashbacks -it only happened a couple times, but it happened- was a bit confusing. I liked the flashbacks otherwise, though.

The book is written in present tense third person, I love third person, but the present tense thing was annoying, and it took me most the book to get used to it to where it didn’t throw me off it anymore.
The fact that it starts with the end is kind of bothersome too. I wish the scene would have been towards the end where it belonged. And speaking of ends, it felt a bit rushed: (view spoiler)

And last but not least, the cheap tack at the end of “if you want the steamy scene join my mailing list”… bad form. Very bad form. If you’re selling your book, sell your book complete/full, and don’t strip things out just to put it “free” (in exchange for an email, so basically, selling it too). Write something new for that.

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The Ships of Earth by Orson Scott Card

Las Naves De La TierraThe Ships of Earth (Homecoming Saga) by Orson Scott Card
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Boring. It was slow slow slow slow slow, and then things got interesting only at the end; and it ended in what seemed to be a bit of an abrupt way, much like if the book had been meant to go together with the next one and not as a standalone.
To put it briefly, the first 7 chapters could have easily just been summed up into one, and save us the boring read to get to the actual interesting parts.

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The Death Cure by James Dashner

The Death Cure (Maze Runner, #3)The Death Cure by James Dashner
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

And then no one asked the right questions and the explanations we did get made no sense (well, they made sense, they were just silly).

The End.

What do you mean there’s more books? I thought this was a trilogy? 😦 I’ll pass, I barely made it this far.

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