Evil Origins Collection by J. Thorn

Evil Origins: A Horror & Dark Fantasy CollectionEvil Origins: A Horror & Dark Fantasy Collection by J. Thorn
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Most boring thing I’ve read in a very long while. I started all 3 of the main novels to see if any caught my interest, but none could.
Could not relate/did not like any of the characters, did not care what happened to them, did not even mind where the story was going and it was so boring that I even got tired of skipping to reach the end and see if anything of interest happened there.

Also did not like the repetitive way in which people’s faces were described. (“His eyes sat (…)”, “His hairline sat (…) “)

Don’t get me wrong, I can see where a certain crowd would like it, but I’m clearly not part of it.

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All Wrapped Up Anthology

All Wrapped UpAll Wrapped Up by Elizabeth Hyder
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Ground Mission: 4.3/5 Now here is present tense done well.

Wildwood: 4/5 I wish it’d had a happier ending though, it was kind of bittersweet.

Dark Covenant: 1/5 (view spoiler)

Situation Normal: 4.3/5 Nice, fun read.

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1984 by George Orwell

19841984 by George Orwell
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

When it’s a well known, famous author and most of your FL gave it a 5 (the rest gave it a 4), you feel a bit hard pressed to rate it high too. But the truth is, for me it was just likeable, just up to there.
No, I didn’t miss any of what was going on, and yes, I gather it’s an excellent story, if you’re into this type of thing; but I guess it’s just not my type of book after all. Oh well. I gave it a try.

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Mary Hades by Sarah Dalton

Mary Hades: Beginnings (Mary Hades, #0.5-2)Mary Hades: Beginnings by Sarah Dalton
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I got this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

I think a 2.5 rating would be more accurate for this collection. On the whole, I liked the story. It was very well told, was entertaining, and I liked the subject, but it cut it just a little short to keep me turning pages, which in turn made me take forever to finish it.

So, while the idea and execution were nice, I think the failure was in my age. There are YA books that can be appreciated by anyone, and there are YA books that are just a little “simple” (stylistically speaking, I don’t think there’s a better way for me to describe this). I honestly think had I been 13 or 16 I would have enjoyed this one a lot more. I can definitely see a younger girl or boy who is into ghosts and mystery and such enjoying the book plenty. Me, I just couldn’t quite get into it even though I liked it. That doesn’t mean someone else who’s even older than me might not enjoy it, but for me it didn’t quite cut it. I didn’t identify in any way with the main character, and even if I didn’t dislike her, I couldn’t quite find myself rooting for her either.
Perhaps it was also that I was expecting a bit more “horror” than we got.

I would still recommend this to YA enthusiasts or actual YAs.

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Discardia by Dinah Sanders

Discardia
Discardia by Dinah Sanders

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

2.5
I was really excited to get my hands on this book at last because honestly, I had been looking to get it since forever ago. I guess because of that I went in with too high expectations, and the book didn’t quite meet them.
To start off with, it’s not at all a bad book; it has some good, solid, sound advice, and I like that it deals not only with material objects but with other aspects of your life as well: digital, relationships, and physical things outside the house, too.
Unfortunately the writing style didn’t resonate with me at all. It’s like it wanted to be read as fiction only it’s really non-fiction and the mix was all weird. The subjects jumped from one to the other in a way that appeared to be random, and the sections seemed overly long and unnecessarily mixed with topics that didn’t seem to make that that much sense together. Wordy, I found it wordy. Which I guess it’s funny to say of a book, but there you have it.
Also I didn’t get at all the reasoning behind separating this “holiday” in sections, since the book didn’t give any sort of actual guidelines on “how to celebrate it”, but rather gave a very open interpretation of all you could do (rather indistinct of the time of the year, I felt; or perhaps it’s because I’m in the wrong hemisphere? Who knows?).

So, it’s not a bad book, but I found myself skimming many parts more than reading them through. Basic advice was found within, but really, if you’re into decluttering and have read any other amount of books and/or blogs on the subject, you’ve probably already heard most of it.

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Write to Market: Deliver a Book that Sells by Chris Fox

Write to Market: Deliver a Book that SellsWrite to Market: Deliver a Book that Sells by Chris Fox
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a very neat book that explains properly what writing to market means. The explanations and examples are pretty clear and to the point, though I do wish (as someone else mentioned in reviews) that the author would have taken the time to put examples in more than one genre for each section, so as to add a bit of variety and truly drive the point in.
I also wish the exercises would have been better fleshed out: more in depth and perhaps a bit more visual/more exemplified too, as they felt a little vague and the whole Amazon ranking system et all related searching is a real headache for me to comprehend.

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One Giant Leap by Kay Simone

One Giant LeapOne Giant Leap by Kay Simone
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A very nice, slow-burn romance about an astronaut and his CAPCOM. I picked up the book because the premise sounded interesting. Space exploration is something I find very interesting (and I love sci-fi things), and the idea of a slow-burn, age-difference, long-distance relationship was quite attractive.
It didn’t disappoint: I loved the main characters and the way they seemed to fit with each other, as well as their personalities. I was a bit surprised (and sad) that the mission they were on was actually so short, I wouldn’t have minded if it’d been a bit longer and they’d had even more time to build the kind of relationship they did. I also, quite surprisingly, found myself quite fond of the secondary characters and the way they related with each other and the main characters. Though Amal felt a bit like she was trying too hard, like she just had to be “edgy” in every possible way.
Not really sure this is a spoiler, but: (view spoiler)
Though the book was “low-heat”, I felt it quite suited the rest of the writing. I did wish the sex scene was a bit more drawn out, but I didn’t hate the gloss over as it wasn’t really that necessary.

But there were also several things I didn’t like, which is why I’m not rating it 5-stars: The news reports were terribly boring and after a few I just skipped/skimmed through them. The way it sometimes went from past to present in sorta unannounced flashbacks -it only happened a couple times, but it happened- was a bit confusing. I liked the flashbacks otherwise, though.

The book is written in present tense third person, I love third person, but the present tense thing was annoying, and it took me most the book to get used to it to where it didn’t throw me off it anymore.
The fact that it starts with the end is kind of bothersome too. I wish the scene would have been towards the end where it belonged. And speaking of ends, it felt a bit rushed: (view spoiler)

And last but not least, the cheap tack at the end of “if you want the steamy scene join my mailing list”… bad form. Very bad form. If you’re selling your book, sell your book complete/full, and don’t strip things out just to put it “free” (in exchange for an email, so basically, selling it too). Write something new for that.

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Bundori by Laura Joh Rowland

Bundori:: A Novel of JapanBundori: A Novel of Japan by Laura Joh Rowland
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Oh man, this book was so hard to get through. Mostly because of its length and the way it was written, than out of dislike for the story.

I admit I have a love/hate situation going on with this series. On the one hand, I love all the historical details and how they’re woven into the story, the settings are realistic, Sano is (albeit slightly annoying to me in his personality) portrayed in a way believable to what and who he is supposed to be, and the crime/mystery aspect of the series is very well played and more or less interesting.

On the other hand, I (as I already stated) dislike Sano’s personality, don’t really care what becomes of the characters, find the repetitive descriptions dragging, and the sprinkled Japanese words reek of fanfic (and I’m not even talking about the titles of their jobs, which require a one paragraph explanation on what position it exactly is else no one [except those who know Japanese and their history] would know, because using the actual words in English like “retainer” and “captain” or whatever apparently takes it too far out of ‘the setting’).

I don’t think I’ll be continuing the series unless I’m very bored or very in need for a kick for some Feudal Japan. I know they’re not the longest books ever, but something about the writing style just makes them drag on forever. If the books were about half the length they are, I might have read on, but as they are… nope.

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Basic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in Yoga by Alanna Kaivalya

Basic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in YogaBasic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in Yoga by Alanna Kaivalya
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

It’s actually for teachers only, despite the blurb mentioning it’s for students as well. That, or someone ate half my copy.
I was disappointed because I expected there would be tips for adjusting into the poses right or modifying them a bit for different body types if certain adjustments couldn’t be achieved, as a student as well as as a teacher, but there was only teacher hands-on adjustment tips.

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The Secret Lives of Hoarders by Matt Paxton

The Secret Lives of Hoarders: True Stories of Tackling Extreme ClutterThe Secret Lives of Hoarders: True Stories of Tackling Extreme Clutter by Matt Paxton
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

If I’d been living in the US I might have given it 3 stars. The book itself is interesting, however it is probably of more use to someone living in the US and dealing with hoarders than someone living abroad in the same situation, as many of the options it gave you (on the part of what you could do with the hoarder’s items, for instance) were US-based.
Otherwise not bad, but not awesome either.

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