Writing Habit Mastery by S. J. Scott

Writing Habit Mastery - How to Write 2,000 Words a Day and Forever Cure Writer’s BlockWriting Habit Mastery – How to Write 2,000 Words a Day and Forever Cure Writer’s Block by S.J. Scott
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Great tips, but sadly nothing new under the sun, as most things said here you can find in just about any blog, for free. It’s a to-the-point book, though, and tries not to beat around the bush on the explanations of the tips and tactics, so that’s nice. A good read if you need to be reminded to just sit and write.
I particularly enjoyed the section on outlining.

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42: Deep Thought on Life, the Universe, and Everything by Mark Vernon

42: Deep Thought on Life, the Universe, and Everything42: Deep Thought on Life, the Universe, and Everything by Mark Vernon
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I feel very special at being the first one to rate this book a one star.

Not really.
The quotations were cool The “brilliant observations” were not (they were also not particularly ‘brilliant’ in my opinion). Too bad, because I really wanted to like this book.
I guess I’m the only one who expected more (fun) out of something with that title. And, you know, the part where it claimed to be “easy and fun to read”…
It was easy, it wasn’t fun. I got bored, I moved on.

Either philosophy books aren’t for me or I’m really choosing all the bad ones.

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Discardia by Dinah Sanders

Discardia
Discardia by Dinah Sanders

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

2.5
I was really excited to get my hands on this book at last because honestly, I had been looking to get it since forever ago. I guess because of that I went in with too high expectations, and the book didn’t quite meet them.
To start off with, it’s not at all a bad book; it has some good, solid, sound advice, and I like that it deals not only with material objects but with other aspects of your life as well: digital, relationships, and physical things outside the house, too.
Unfortunately the writing style didn’t resonate with me at all. It’s like it wanted to be read as fiction only it’s really non-fiction and the mix was all weird. The subjects jumped from one to the other in a way that appeared to be random, and the sections seemed overly long and unnecessarily mixed with topics that didn’t seem to make that that much sense together. Wordy, I found it wordy. Which I guess it’s funny to say of a book, but there you have it.
Also I didn’t get at all the reasoning behind separating this “holiday” in sections, since the book didn’t give any sort of actual guidelines on “how to celebrate it”, but rather gave a very open interpretation of all you could do (rather indistinct of the time of the year, I felt; or perhaps it’s because I’m in the wrong hemisphere? Who knows?).

So, it’s not a bad book, but I found myself skimming many parts more than reading them through. Basic advice was found within, but really, if you’re into decluttering and have read any other amount of books and/or blogs on the subject, you’ve probably already heard most of it.

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Write to Market: Deliver a Book that Sells by Chris Fox

Write to Market: Deliver a Book that SellsWrite to Market: Deliver a Book that Sells by Chris Fox
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a very neat book that explains properly what writing to market means. The explanations and examples are pretty clear and to the point, though I do wish (as someone else mentioned in reviews) that the author would have taken the time to put examples in more than one genre for each section, so as to add a bit of variety and truly drive the point in.
I also wish the exercises would have been better fleshed out: more in depth and perhaps a bit more visual/more exemplified too, as they felt a little vague and the whole Amazon ranking system et all related searching is a real headache for me to comprehend.

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Basic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in Yoga by Alanna Kaivalya

Basic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in YogaBasic Art of Adjustments: A Beginning Guide to Meaningful & Safe Adjustments in Yoga by Alanna Kaivalya
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

It’s actually for teachers only, despite the blurb mentioning it’s for students as well. That, or someone ate half my copy.
I was disappointed because I expected there would be tips for adjusting into the poses right or modifying them a bit for different body types if certain adjustments couldn’t be achieved, as a student as well as as a teacher, but there was only teacher hands-on adjustment tips.

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The Secret Lives of Hoarders by Matt Paxton

The Secret Lives of Hoarders: True Stories of Tackling Extreme ClutterThe Secret Lives of Hoarders: True Stories of Tackling Extreme Clutter by Matt Paxton
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

If I’d been living in the US I might have given it 3 stars. The book itself is interesting, however it is probably of more use to someone living in the US and dealing with hoarders than someone living abroad in the same situation, as many of the options it gave you (on the part of what you could do with the hoarder’s items, for instance) were US-based.
Otherwise not bad, but not awesome either.

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Does This Clutter Make my Butt Look Big? by Peter Walsh

Does This Clutter Make My Butt Look Big?: The 6 Step Total Life Approach to Permanently Clearing Out the Clutter that Redefines How You Live, What You Eat, and How You LookDoes This Clutter Make My Butt Look Big?: The 6 Step Total Life Approach to Permanently Clearing Out the Clutter that Redefines How You Live, What You Eat, and How You Look by Peter Walsh
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I musn’t have been paying attention, because I totally didn’t -really- expect this book to be about weight loss when I started it. Buuut I was quite happy with it. Yes, it’s simple, basic, doesn’t say anything new that someone who’s been digging into organization and/or weight loss and/or fitness/life improvement doesn’t know, but it gathers all those simple tips in one place and reminds you of them.
Pretty nice, and pretty logical.

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100 Things Every Writer Needs to Know by Scott Edelstein

100 Things Every Writer Needs to Know100 Things Every Writer Needs to Know by Scott Edelstein
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Good, but very basic and slightly outdated.
Spans through a variety of topics, from how to start, to how to actually write, to publishing and how to make money off your writing.

It had some interesting points of reference (like the section on terminology, or #44 and #82), but still brought nothing new to the table. Recommended for someone just getting into writing and who doesn’t know much about the subject at all, but if you are already pretty familiar with writing, I’d give it a pass.

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Minimalism by Bekka Thomas

Minimalism: How to Become a Minimalist (Illustrated With Bad Drawings)Minimalism: How to Become a Minimalist by Bekka Thomas
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

It was an alright book. I appreciate that the author told a bit of her story and how it led her to minimalism, which was interesting, but it felt a bit TMI/Why-do-I-want-to-know-this at times and dragged on. Not that I don’t sympathize, but just… it was not what I thought I’d get when I grabbed the book.

It had some basic tips/ideas/reasoning for getting rid of things and getting into minimalism, but it wasn’t really something I would have titled “How to become a minimalist”; more like “How I became a minimalist”, which is an entirely different category.
The first title makes you go into reading it expecting less life story and more help with the how-to, the latter tells you there’s more story besides the possible tips and, for me at least, needed a different mind-frame for reading. The book was in the latter category, and I felt just a little mislead/cheated by the title.

Still, if you’re overwhelmed by stuff and new to minimalism, it’s not a bad read.

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Stuffocation by James Wallman

StuffocationStuffocation by James Wallman
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I think this reviewer said it much better, but here it goes anyway:
For a book dealing with clutter and minimalism (and other similar subjects), it sure was cluttered! The idea was good, some of the information you could extract was interesting, but to get to it you had to wade through a mix of extremely boring anecdotes/quasi-stories, and loads of fact dump (it kept going from one to the other indiscriminately). Eventually I just grew bored and gave up reading it. I just don’t have the patience for it.

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